Intermountain Jewish News

Banner
Tuesday,
Jul 22nd
Home Columns Jewish Parenting Teaching your kids about money

Teaching your kids about money

WHEN my son was in first grade, he told me he wanted a Wii game console for his birthday.

“Jake,” I replied, intent on giving my son perspective on how much his request would cost, “do you realize that you could go to the dollar store and buy 300 toys for the price of one Wii?”

“Really?” Jake asked, clearly pondering this revelation. “I guess I’ll just do that instead!”

It’s not that my son was inherently greedy. To the contrary, he’s compassionate and generous. It’s just that he was in a developmental place where it was difficult for him to grasp the concept and value of money.

In fact, the vast majority of grade-schoolers (up to age 11) are what cognitive psychologists call concrete thinkers.

That means they have a tough time conceptualizing anything they can’t physically see or touch. Money — thanks to credit cards, checks, internet PayPal accounts and the like — is a hugely abstract concept.

Through the eyes of my soon to be seven-year-old, the difference between $300, $30 and $3 was largely inconsequential.

I know it seems hard to believe that this could be so, but that’s only because we adults have the ability to think abstractly.

Trust me, after two decades teaching elementary students, I can tell you that, with rare exceptions, the only way an early elementary-aged child is going to truly understand the quantitative distinction between these amounts is if he actually sees 300 one dollar bills piled next to 30 one dollar bills piled next to 3 one dollar bills.

SO how do we enlighten our concrete-thinking kiddies to the fact that, despite popular playground belief, money doesn’t grow in ATM machines? With the Spend/Save/Tzedakah plan.

A super-concrete, positively-priceless program that helps children grasp the value of money, empowers them with financial smarts and encourages them to give back to their community, all in one fell swoop.

Here’s what you need to know to get it working for your little spenders.

Three Little Piggies

The basic premise of the spend/save/tzedakah plan is to have our kids regularly divide their allowance into three distinct segments: one for personal spending, one for saving and one for giving.

Deciding how to allocate the money (e.g., 60% spending, 30% savings and 10% tzedakah) is a personal family choice, but it’s important to make sure kids stick to their designated amounts every week.

Spending

For the Spend/Save/Tzedakah plan to work, children should be required to use their personal spending money for all non-essential purchases other than birthday and Chanukah gifts. That means our kids pay for their own popcorn at the movies, Power Ranger popsicles from the ice cream man and fruitless attempts on the “try-to-pick-up-a-stuffed-animal-with-a-metal-claw” machine. Still doubtful?  Consider the following scenarios:

Shopping at Target without the Spend/Save/Tzedakah Plan:

Child: Can I get that Hot Wheels Car?

Parent: No

Child: Please? It’s only $1.29, and I’ve really been wanting that one.

Parent: I said NO.

Child: But, it’s a Hummer Hot Wheels — with real monster truck wheels!”

Parent: How many times do I have to tell you? No means no!

Child: Please? PLEASE? PLEEEEASE?!!!!

Parent: Okay. Just put it in the cart and stop whining.

(Epilogue: The same scene plays out the next day, only this time the kid wants a pair of $70 Heelies roller sneakers).

Shopping at Target with the Spend/Save/Tzedakah plan:

Child: Can I get that Hot Wheels Car?

Parent: Sure. You can use your spending money any way you’d like.

Child: Well, I don’t really need it. I’d rather save my money for those Heelies roller sneakers.

On Saving

Just to clarify.  The kind of savings we’re talking about here is the kind you put away for a long-term goal — like going to college or spending a high-school semester in Israel — not an exorbitantly priced toy or an overpriced outfit.

The key here is to help our children move beyond the instant gratification mentality toward understanding that some things cost so much money it takes years to save and pay for them.

Finally, it’s important for children to have a concrete representation of their savings progress.

Have them place a sticker on a chart each time they surpass a $10 dollar increment, or enroll them in a kiddie savings program that requires no minimum balance and provides monthly statements.

We parents will be as excited as our kids to see how much money they are putting away for their future!

Tzedakah

Our kids’ lives largely exist within a vacuum. They have their families, their friends, their schools, their neighborhoods and their material possessions. They often don’t think consider the needs of those less fortunate, not because they don’t care but because they are not used to thinking outside their familiar worlds.

By putting a small portion of their allowance toward tzedakah each week, our children will begin to appreciate their responsibility as Jews and human beings to share their resources with the community. They’ll come to recognize that many of life’s most precious gifts come without a barcode. And that, in the scheme of things, a Wii (or an iPhone 5 or iPad Mini or whatever else our kids may be eyeing these days) isn’t really that important after all.

Last Updated ( Friday, 02 November 2012 07:18 )  

IJN e-Edition

This is only a taste! Get full access to the IJN via our e-Edition, only $14.04 for IJN Print subscribers.

E-Edition subscribers get access to a complete digital replica of the IJN, which includes all special sections.

Get the IJN's free newsletter!

Shabbat Times

JTA News

With jabs at Obama, CUFI lobbies for Iran sanctions, end to P.A. aid

Ron Kampeas With sharp jabs at the Obama administration, Christians United for Israel launched its annual Washington rally with appeals to Congress to impose new sanctions on Iran and cut off funding to the Pales... [Link]

Rocket hits Tel Aviv-area home as Gaza fighting continues

Marcy Oster A rocket or part of a rocket fired from Gaza scored a direct hit on a house in a suburb of Tel Aviv. ... [Link]

Ukrainian Jewish leaders slam top European rabbis’ visit to Crimea

Cnaan Liphshiz Leaders of a prominent Jewish community in Ukraine criticized European rabbis who attended a Kremlin-sponsored Holocaust commemoration ceremony in Crimea. ... [Link]

U.S. commits $47 million in humanitarian assistance for Gaza

Marcy Oster The United States has committed $47 million to help alleviate the humanitarian crisis in Gaza. ... [Link]

State Department warns Americans to defer Israel travel

Marcy Oster The U.S. State Department has issued a warning to American citizens, calling on them to defer non-essential travel to Israel and the West Bank. ... [Link]

Two more IDF soldiers killed in Gaza combat, another believed dead is missing

Marcy Oster Two additional Israeli soldiers were killed in combat in Gaza, and a soldier who was believed to have been killed when an IDF armored vehicle was attacked is missing. ... [Link]

Kibitzing with Alan Dershowitz at the Chilmark General Store

Anthony Weiss The famed attorney and other machers schmooze at a low-key spot on Martha’s Vineyard. ... [Link]

After Harvard, Alan Dershowitz plans an active — and combative — retirement

Anthony Weiss The famed attorney has retired from Harvard Law School, but he is not planning a quiet life. ... [Link]

Intermountain Jewish News • 1177 Grant Street • Denver, CO 80203 • 303 861 2234 • FAX 303 832 6942
email@ijn.com • larry@ijn.com • lori@ijn.com